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Nuclear weapons: Difference between revisions

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* Energy-mass equivalence - electron-volts - curve of binding energy - energy scales (chemical vs nuclear vs annihilative)
* Energy-mass equivalence - electron-volts - curve of binding energy - energy scales (chemical vs nuclear vs annihilative)
* Pressure - temperature - ideal gases - brownian motion - radiative ablation - ionization - plasmas
* Pressure - temperature - ideal gases - brownian motion - radiative ablation - ionization - plasmas
* The atom - the nucleus - periodic trends - size scales (electron vs proton vs neutron vs alpha particle vs large nucleus vs atomic radius vs molecular size)
* The atom - the nucleus - periodic trends - size scales (''e'' vs ''p'' vs ''n'' vs α vs large nucleus vs atomic radius vs molecular size)
* Stable and unstable isotopes - half-life / expected time to decay - odd-even mass differences
* Radiations (α, β, γ aka alpha, beta, gamma) - transmutations (there are many!)
* Shell models of the atom and nucleus - Coulomb potentials - Yukawa potentials
* Shell models of the atom and nucleus - Coulomb potentials - Yukawa potentials
* Neutron absorption and scattering - fission probability - pre- and post-scission - Doppler broadening
* Neutron absorption and scattering - fission probability - pre- and post-scission - Doppler broadening
** Neutron effect is a function of (a) incident neutron energy (b) many-body nucleon-nucleon forces and (c) luck
** Neutron effect is a function of (a) incident neutron energy (b) many-body nucleon-nucleon forces and (c) luck
** Resonance with nucleus activation energies leads to preferring absorption over scattering
** Resonance with nucleus activation energies leads to preferring absorption over scattering
** An absorption might deform the nucleus sufficiently that a two-body Coulomb system overpowers the SNF
** An absorption might deform the nucleus sufficiently that a two-body Coulomb repulsion overpowers the binding force
*** This is the probability of fissioning, as opposed to merely emitting a γ.
*** This is the probability of fissioning (W<sub>fis</sub>), as opposed to merely emitting a γ-ray.
** Nucleon-nucleon forces are typically described in per-{isotope X fine structure} terms, ignoring hyperfine details
** Nucleon-nucleon forces are typically described in per-{isotope X fine structure} terms, ignoring hyperfine details
** Result: for a given isotope, there's a function taking {excitation level X neutron energy} to {first-order fission probability}
** Result: for a given isotope, there's a function taking {excitation level X neutron energy} to {first-order fission probability}
* Electrodynamics - strong nuclear force - weak nuclear force - quantum tunneling
* Electrodynamics - strong nuclear force - weak nuclear force - quantum tunneling
** Thermal neutrons can't classically cross Coulomb repulsions, but tunneling permits π-induced fission (π = pion, aka any of 3 π-mesons)
** Thermal neutrons can't classically cross Coulomb repulsions, but tunneling permits π-induced fission (π = pion, aka any of 3 π-mesons)
* Stable and unstable isotopes - half-life / expected time to decay - odd-even mass differences
* Radiations (alpha, beta, gamma) - transmutations (there are many!)
* Liquid drop model - superdeformation - hyperdeformation - compound nucleus
* Liquid drop model - superdeformation - hyperdeformation - compound nucleus
* Nilsson model - (two-humped) fission barrier - fission isomer
* Nilsson model - (two-humped) fission barrier - fission isomer